Sunday Morning Coming Down #Two


• "Hummel's defiance of interest is almost its own kind of interest." Ryan Maffei at Kill Me With Sound throws down on Big Star and power pop. 

• "Kurt made this whole lecture to me about that fundamental fact in rock'n'roll that I really didn't know, which is that your drummer is the most important person in your band." The oral history of Live Through This is in Spin.

• "In the Billboard issue dated November 23, 1963, just under half of the Top 10 on the Hot R&B Singles chart was by white acts. And I mean really white. What was No. 1 on the R&B chart back then? A song by white pop band Jimmy Gilmer & the Fireballs called “Sugar Shack”, a million-seller that also topped the Hot 100 and was Billboard’s No. 1 single of 1963. It’s a hokey song—and whatever its merits, the idea that “Sugar Shack” was a major hit among black audiences beggars belief." Chris Molanphy outlines the trouble(s) with Billboard's R&B Charts for Pitchfork.

• "Bros getting resourceful." Noisey presents The Bro-Ification Of Coachella.

• "I have to call what we're hearing from the anti-pop authors a backlash, sour grapes from people just noticing that a cultural battle is over and they "lost." We can sympathize with their sense of bewilderment and status vertigo — the way we can with "men's rights" activists, for instance — without letting ourselves be trolled into rehashing the "disco sucks" debate. Let's not be sore winners." Ann Powers and Carl Wilson talk about love, er, pop at NPR.

• "Later, back at the house, guitar in hand, I said, "Okay, so how does that tuning go again?" He stomped off grumbling and waving his arms in exasperation. Fifteen minutes later he reappeared and handed me the pages featured here." John Fahey explains how to play a guitar in C tuning in handwriting at the John Fahey website.

• "In the UK in 2011, there were 277 exclusive Record Store Day releases. This year there are 643. Whether anyone needs these releases is a moot point; the problem in the run up to 2014's event is that the scale of Record Store Day has started to cause considerable collateral damage across the entire independent music sector – particularly for smaller labels, regardless of whether they're involved in the day or not." Phil Hebblethwaite investigates the murky side of Record Store Day for The Quietus.

• "I have more records than books." Gabriel Garcia Marquez was a Beatles fan at Flavorwire.

• "Today, it’s difficult to recall a time when every track in the world wasn’t available somewhere on the Infinite Jukebox. In the late ‘80s, however, Brazil Classics 1: Beleza Tropical arrived like a smart, sultry revelation; it was more a mixtape that engaged you from beginning to end rather than a playlist you’d lose interest in after a track-and-a-half." Richard Gehr sketches a brief intro to Luaka Bop for Red Bull Music Academy.

• "In short, we are likely in for a blitz. Frankly, it's about time. Prince's music hasn't necessarily gone anywhere, but in an era when even Interpol receives a deluxe, bonus-laden reissue, his are almost the only recordings in their league not to have been given at least a brush-up. And just to be clear about which league that is, for prolificacy, popularity, range, and sustained quality, the only pop catalog to come near Prince's '80s work belongs to the Beatles." Michaelangelo Matos prepares us for the upcoming Prince remastering deluge at NPR's The Record.

• "As part of our examination of the last century of New York pop music, illustrator Sarah King created this map of the city's hip-hop landmarks, from 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx (the site of DJ Kool Herc's rec-room parties) down to Staten Island's Stapleton Houses (home base for the Wu-Tang Clan). Take a look below to explore the streets where rhyme met rhythm." Click here to check it, fool.