Sunday Morning Coming Down #Four


• "You could also put the class question another way: except perhaps for the Laramie librarian who rescues her nephew in Lean on Pete, it's impossible to imagine any of Vlautin's characters reading The Barnes & Noble Review. These are not our people, people. Only they are, and not just as fellow citizens whose well-being inflects the health and legitimacy of the so-called humanities that provide our pleasure and solace. They too find succor in the arts." Robert Christgau spills the beans on Willy Vlautin's literary hits at Barnes & Noble.

• Scott Woods interviews Tom Hull, the Wichita-based critic responsible for "several millions of words" on rock, pop, and jazz, as well as curating the Robert Christgau's website.  Tom answers a bunch of questions (as well ticking off his free jazz faves) at Rockcritics.com    

• "Industry figures are hard to get hold of. Some are even secret. Last.Fm’s royalty and payment system is beyond comprehension." Information Is Beautiful parses our new digital marketplace.

 • "A record company such as us, needing to provide the services we do, cannot survive even paying artists 50% of net core income, let alone 50% of gross as we have been doing. As streaming becomes core income, it has to bear its share of all our costs: A&R, overhead, marketing, promotion, back office services, etc." Meanwhile, Martin Mills of Beggar's Group announces a departure from the 50/50 streaming split for Billboard

• "When Frankie Knuckles died, there was a sense that Chicago house music had lost an invaluable piece of its history. Juke and footwork innovator DJ Rashad's death hurts in a different way: As the dance music community grieves for the 34-year-old footwork producer, it's beginning to sink in that, this time, we've lost an unfathomably large chunk of the music's future." Geeta Dayal, Philip Sherburne, Puja Patel and others pick favorite DJ Rashad tracks for SPIN.

• "I still tend to actually buy my music so that people like me can make more music and I think I’d buy this." The Chills' Martin Phillipps reviews Days of Abandon by The Pains of Being Pure at Heart at the Talkhouse.

• "Just then, Harry Belafonte walked back into the dressing room and greeted Robert warmly. I stood up and Robert Plant said, “Harry, do you know Jon?” to which Harry replied “Oh yes, I know Jon!” suggesting some mysterious mutually respectful relationship stretching back over the decades. He did not say “Yeah, he just accosted me about half an hour ago by the Coke machine!” And while we're at it, Jon Langford talks meeting his idols at Talkhouse.

• "John Jeremiah Sullivan and Caitlin Love wormed their way into the home of an elderly invalid under the guise of ‘helping him,' then proceeded to rifle through his files and help themselves to his research, his photographs and his personal possessions. There is no disputing these facts because Sullivan admitted as much in his own article.” Susannah McCormick cries foul over John Jeremiah Sullivan's NYT Magazine Cover story.

 • "It saddens me that Susannah McCormick feels I “glibly” stole from research done by her father, a person whose work I deeply admire. His achievements in the blues field are a focus of my piece. As I made clear, everything we’ve learned about Geeshie and Elvie begins with discoveries made by McCormick in the early sixties." John Jeremiah Sullivan responds to Susannah McCormick.

• "As for the commonly held assertion that forever is tonight, even a cursory knowledge of quantum mechanics suffices to prove this notion false." Top Theoretical Physicists, R&B Singers Meet To Debate Meaning Of Forever at The Onion.

• "Bowie's career in The Seventies also overlaps in a wobbly way with my own life – I was twelve in 1970 at school, and twenty-two in 1979 in The Go-Betweens." Robert Forster talks about Bowie in the '70s at DoubleJ.

• "I love these guys and want them to be successful because their hard work deserves it. My work looks to cherish the moments in between the chaos with these artists: the calm before the storm or, even, the calm that underlies the storm." Jessica Lehrman's photo shoot of New York hip-hop.